Devil’s Quoit

Devil’s Quoit (St Columb Major) This is the capstone of a burial chamber. It was destroyed in 1870. The capstone has been preserved by St Columb Old Cornwall Society.

Davies Gilbert (born Davies Giddy, 1767-1839) was a Cornish engineer, author, and politician

Davies Gilbert wrote in his book (Gilbert’s Parochial History)…….In the parish of Columb Major, Stands Castell-an-Dinas. Near this castle, by the highway, stands the Coyt, a stony tumulus so called, of which sort there are many in Wales and Wiltshire, as is mentioned is the ‘Additions to Camden’s Britannia,’ in these places, commonly called the Devils Coyts. It consists of four long stones of great bigness, perpendicularly pitched in the earth contiguous with each other, leaving only a small vacancy downwards, but meeting together at the top; over all which is laid a fiat stone of prodigious bulk and magnitude, bending towards the east in way of adoration (as Mr Llwyd concludes of all those Coyts elsewhere), as the person therein under it interred did when in the land of the living; but how or by what art this prodigious flat stone should be placed on the top of the others, amazeth the wisest mathematicians, engineers, or architects to tell or conjecture. Coit, in Belgic-British, is a cave, vault, or co[r?]n-house, of which coyt might possibly be a corruption.” — Gilbert’s Parochial History.

 

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